Climate Change and Indigenous Communities: How Can Dartmouth Make a Difference?

Dartmouth Events

Climate Change and Indigenous Communities: How Can Dartmouth Make a Difference?

Public Event with Q&A. Join us for a light lunch and a chance to talk with leaders from the Climate Institute. RSVP requested.

Thursday, April 3, 2014
12:00pm-2:00pm
Silsby 215
Intended Audience(s): Public
Categories: Free Food, Lectures & Seminars, Workshops & Training
Registration required.

RSVP Requested:  http://celt-climatechange-14s.eventbrite.com

How can Dartmouth be a leader in facilitating climate protection activities in Indigenous Communities?  Find out more at a free, public luncheon event co-sponsored by the Center for Environmental Leadership Training (CELT) and the Rockefeller Center!  Pizza will be served!

Indigenous People’s Climate Change Working Group Conference took place November 4-5, hosted by Dartmouth College. CELT, Rocky Center and Dickey Center are building on its momentum.  The Climate Institute and its Dartmouth Interns are here on campus to present ways in which you can become active in climate problem solving and become leaders in the field. This luncheon panel will focus on how the Dartmouth community can work with tribal colleges and communities on climate responses. The Climate Institute is the world’s first NGO based solely on addressing climate change formed in 1986 and has been active in 40 nations.

The Center for Environmental Leadership Training (CELT) the educational arm of the Climate Institute, based in Hanover, NH is a rapidly growing team of students and international virtual interns, who are working on several key projects to promote climate awareness and create problem solvers of us all, including:
• CELT's Smart Solutions Blog
• Problem solving games including Saving the Arctic game
• The Tickell Climate Network
• Writing pieces for the Climate Alert
• Potential Internships in the U.S. and Mexico for the upcoming fall and winter terms

Join us for lunch and a chance to talk with the president of The Climate Institute, Mr. John Topping Jr. '64, and a panel of current CELT interns:

  • Autumn Brunelle, Dartmouth 2015, Rockefeller Center Intern and CELT Spring Term Coordinator, a member of Ojibwa Tribe from Minnesota
  • Ma'Ko'Quah Abigail Jones, Dartmouth College 2014 CELT Intern. She has worked at the Haskell Environmental Research Studies Center and Dartmouth, researching the impacts of climate change on indigenous coastal communities. In recognition for her participation in President Obama’s Great Outdoors Initiative, MaKoQuah was one among a small group of young Native American environmental leaders to be honored by the White House Council on Environmental Quality. She was a lead organizer of the Nov 3-5, 2013 Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Working Group Conference hosted by Dartmouth.
  • John C. Topping, Jr. of Hanover, NH, Member of Dartmouth Class of 1964, Co-Founder and President of the Climate Institute since 1986, winner in 2002 of Dartmouth’s first Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Social Justice Award for Lifetime Achievement and recipient in 2008 from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change of a Certificate of Recognition for Contributing to the Award of the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 to the IPCC.
  • Trevelyan Wing, Dartmouth 2014. As Stefansson Fellow lived among Sámi reindeer herders in Scandinavia researching effects of climate change on herding culture and development of Sámi political institutions. Political intern at US Embassy Paris; Economic & Science Affairs intern at US Mission to United Nations Geneva, on Advisory Board organizing first UN Global Youth Summit 2013, attended as American delegate. Awarded Lombard Public Service Fellowship to create global Indigenous Youth Forum on Climate Change, to employ virtual platform bringing Native youth leaders in dialogue on climate change issues.
For more information, contact:
Autumn Brunelle

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.