John L. Campbell

Chair, Department of Sociology, Dartmouth College
The Class of 1925 Professorship, Dartmouth College
Professor of Sociology, Dartmouth College
Professor of Political Economy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

John Campbell's research interests span economic and political sociology, comparative political economy, and institutional theory.  He has written about energy and tax policy, the evolution of the U.S. economy, transformations of post-communist societies in Eastern Europe, corporate social responsibility, globalization, the role of ideas and experts in policymaking, and the 2008 financial crisis.  The thread connecting all of this is his interest in how institutions affect national political economies and how they change.  His most recent books are The National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany and Denmark (Princeton University Press, 2014), which is about how policy research and advising is conducted in different countries, and The World of States (Bloomsbury Press, 2015), which is about how nation-states in different parts of the world have responded to globalization and other changes in the international political economy.  He is currently writing a new book, The Paradox of Vulnerability: Small Nation-States and the Financial Crisis (Princeton University Press, forthcoming), which is about how small countries responded to the 2008 financial crisis. 

603-646-2542
123 Silsby Hall
HB 6104
Department(s): 
Sociology
Education: 
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin at Madison
M.A. Michigan State University
B.A. St. Lawrence University

Selected Publications

BOOKS:

Campbell, John L. and John A. Hall.  2015.  The World of StatesLondon: Bloomsbury Press.

Campbell, John L. and Ove K. Pedersen. 2014. The National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany and Denmark. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Morgan, Glenn, John L. Campbell, Colin Crouch, Ove K. Pedersen, and Richard Whitley, editors. 2010. Oxford Handbook of Comparative Institutional Analysis. New York:  Oxford University Press.

Campbell, John L., John A. Hall, Ove K. Pedersen, editors.  2006.  National Identity and the Varieties of Capitalism: The Danish ExperienceMontreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Campbell, John L.  2004.  Institutional Change and GlobalizationPrinceton:  Princeton University Press.

Campbell, John L. and Ove K. Pedersen, editors.  2001.  The Rise of Neoliberalism and Institutional AnalysisPrinceton: Princeton University Press.

ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS:

Campbell, John L. and Ove K. Pedersen.  2015.  "Policy Ideas, Knowledge Regimes and Comparative Political Economy."  Socio-Economic Review  13(4)679-702.

Campbell, John L. and John A. Hall.  2015.  "The World of States."  The World Financial Review March/April pp. 8-11.

Campbell, John L. and John A. Hall.  2015.  "Small States, Nationalism and Institutional Capacities: An Explanation of the Difference in Response of Ireland and Denmark to the Financial Crisis."  European Journal of Sociology  56(1)143-174.

Campbell, John L. and John A. Hall.  2015.  "The Economic Consequences of the Size of Nations: Denmark in Comparative Perspective."  In Building the Nation: Nikolai Grundtvig and Danaish National Identity, edited by John A. Hall, Ove Korsgaard and Ove K. Pedersen.  Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press.

Campbell,  John L. and Ove K. Pedersen.  2015.  "Making Sense of Economic Uncertainty: Knowledge Regimes in the United States and Denmark."  Pp. 22-40 in Sources of National Institutional Competitiveness: Sense Making and Institutional Change, edited by Susana Borras and Leonard Seabrooke.  New York: Oxford University Press.

Campbell, John L. and Ove. K. Pedersen.  2014.  "The National Origins of Policy Ideas."  The World Financial Review July/August, pp. 26-28.

Campbell, John L., Charles Quincy, Jordan Osserman and Ove K. Pedersen.  2013.  "Coding In-Depth Semi-Structured Interviews: Problems of Unitization and Inter-Coder Reliability and Agreement."  Sociological Methods and Research 42 (3)294-320.

Patsiurko, Natalka, John L. Campbell and John A. Hall. 2013. "Nation-State Size, Ethnic Diversity and Economic Performance in the Advanced Capitalist Countries." New Political Economy  18(6)827-844.

Patsiurko, Natalka, John L. Campbell and John A. Hall. 2012. "Measuring Cultural Diversity: Ethnic, Linguistic and Religious Fractionalization in the OECD." Ethnic and Racial Studies 35(2)195-217.

Campbell, John L. 2011. "The U.S. Financial Crisis: Lessons for Theories of Institutional Complementarity." Socio-Economic Review 9:211-34.

Campbell, John L. and Ove K. Pederson. 2011. "Knowledge Regimes and Comparative Political Economy." Pp 167-90 in Ideas and Politics in Social Science Research, edited by Daniel Béland and Robert Cox. New York: Oxford University Press.

Campbell, John L. 2010. "Neoliberalism in Crisis: Regulatory Roots of the U.S. Financial Meltdown." Research in the Sociology of Organizations 30B:65-101.

Campbell, John L. 2010. "Institutional Reproduction and Change." Pp. 87-115 in Oxford Handbook of Comparative Institutional Analysis, edited by Glenn Morgan, John L. Campbell, Colin Crouch, Ove K. Pedersen, and Richard Whitley. New York: Oxford University Press.

Campbell, John L. and John A. Hall. 2010. "Defending the Gellnerian Premise: Denmark in Historical and Comparative Context." Nations and Nationalism 16(1)89-107.

Campbell, John L. 2010.  "Neoliberalism's Penal and Debtor States: A Rejoinder to Löic Wacquant."  Theoretical Criminology 14(1)59-73.

Campbell, John L. and John A. Hall. 2009. "National Identity and the Political Economy of Small States." Review of International Political Economy 16(4)547-572.

Campbell, John L. 2009. "What Do Sociologists Bring to International Political Economy?" Pp. 260-73 in Routledge Handbook of International Political Economy, edited by Mark Blyth. London: Routledge.

Campbell, John L. 2009. "A Renaissance for Fiscal Sociology?" Pp. 256-65 in The New Fiscal Sociology: Taxation in Comparative and Historical Perspective, edited by Issac Martin, Ajay Mehrotra and Monica Prasad. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Campbell, John L. and Ove K. Pedersen.  2007.  “The Varieties of Capitalism and Hybrid Success: Denmark in the Global Economy.” Comparative Political Studies 40(2)307-32.

Campbell, John L.  2007.  “Why Would Corporations Behave in Socially Responsible Ways?  An Institutional Theory of Corporate Social Responsibility.” Academy of Management Review 32(3)946-67.

Campbell, John L.  2005.  “Where Do We Stand?  Common Mechanisms in Organizations and Social Movements Research.” Pp. 41-68 in Social Movements and Organization Theory, edited by Gerald F. Davis, Doug McAdam, W. Richard Scott, and Mayer N. Zald.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Campbell, John L.  2005.  “Fiscal Sociology in an Age of Globalization: Comparing Tax Regimes in Advanced Capitalist Countries.” Pp. 391-418 in The Economic Sociology of Capitalism, edited by Victor Nee and Richard Swedberg.  Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Campbell, John L.  2003.  “States, Politics and Globalization: Why Institutions Still Matter.” Pp. 234-59 in The Nation-State in Question, edited by T.V. Paul, G. John Ikenberry and John A. Hall.  Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Campbell, John L.  2002.  “Ideas, Politics and Public Policy.” Annual Review of Sociology 28:21-38.

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Works in progress

Small Nation-States and the Financial Crisis:

Why do small culturally homogeneous advanced capitalist countries tend to be especially successful in today's global economy?  This project examines the proposition that their success stems from the fact that they have developed a strong sense of vulnerability and national identity, and, in turn, institutional capacities for maneuvering successfully in an increasingly volatile international economy.  The importance of national identity and nationalism more generally has been neglected by most economic sociologists and comparative political economists.  Quantitative analylsis of OECD data as well as detailed historical case studies are used to develop and test the argument.  Preliminary results have been published in Nations and Nationalism, the Review of International Political Economy, Ethnic and Racial StudiesNew Political Economy and the European Journal of Sociology.  Based on a variety of data sources, including many interviews with policymakers, regulatory officials, central bankers, and others, the project  shows through detailed historical case studies how Denmark, Ireland and Switzerland among other countries responded to the 2008 financial crisis as they did due to their experiences as small countries with particular national identities.  Results will appear in Small Nation-States and the Financial Crisis (Princeton University Press).